What do we all love? A come-back story. One of the fabled Grumman “cats,” the F7F-3’s flight path is about redemption–how “the best damn fighter in the world” was literally rescued from the graveyard. Though the Tigercat was originally designed as a combat carrier plane, it never saw service in World War II. That said, this twin-engine fighter combined the power and stealth needed for ground missions in the Korean War, and also found a niche in photo reconnaissance. But it was sorely underused, and every Tigercat would have been turned into scrap metal if it weren’t for another innovation—a second career fighting forest fires. Our F7F-3, one of only 6 Tigercats still flying today, can tell the story.
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2 Responses to “Tigercat”

  1. David Weston says:

    My family and I attended our first Vintage Aircraft Weekend airshow last Sunday, since my Dad was showing off his restored DGA Howard. What a thrill to see all the war birds in flight! The absolute highlight was the Tigercat – what a twin engine beast! To find out that there are only 6 of these still flying made the moment that much more special.

    What a great show you all put on, I’ll be bringing my family back next year for sure.

  2. admin says:

    It should be a grand celebration. This weekend will find us at Paine Field concentrating on the test flight program of the Mig-29. With reference to the Centennial of Navy Aviation, we have met with “the Navy brass” and decided to focus on the regional celebrations, such as a special event at the Museum of Flight on May 14th, the fly-in at Whidbey NAS at the end of July and Seafair, August 5-7. With any luck, both ‘Cats will fly on all three occasions.

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